Lost Weekend III: What We Do In The Shadows

I missed What We Do in the Shadows during Lost Weekend III.  Honestly, I don’t remember why- quite possibly I had a scheduling issue, but it’s more likely that I didn’t pay attention to what it was about, assuming it was a scary film and I’m not usually into horror flicks (sorry Faye!).  So I got a copy from Bowman Library (front and center in the Film Club 3.0 display! Check it out), settled in to watch it, and almost turned it off during the first 15 minutes because I had no idea what I was seeing.  I am here to tell you, I did not follow my instincts and BOY am I glad I didn’t!  This film was a hilarious send up of campy vampires, reality TV, mockumentaries, and bromances.  If you liked Best in Show, Spinal Tap and the like, this film is definitely for you.

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Lost Weekend III: What We Do In The Shadows

Lost Weekend III: Song of the Sea

I had almost little expectations going into this film. I’m not saying I didn’t expect it to be good. I just didn’t know what to expect. I was aware of this film only from hype. That’s not a lot to go on enough for me to get excited about a film. I mostly knew it from the fact that the style looked exactly like that of Secret of The Kells. I still haven’t seen that film, but I think I will be seeing it soon after seeing Song of the Sea. I collect favorite animation studios like Smurfs collect Smurfberries. Disney, Pixar, Ghibli, Laika, Aardman. All amazing. Song of the Sea was my introduction to Irish animation Studio, Cartoon Saloon. It is a discovery I am glad I made.

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Lost Weekend III: Song of the Sea

Lost Weekend III: It Follows

Of the many traits that a film (or TV show, for that matter) can possess that really strikes a chord with me, it’s mystery. I don’t mean in a textbook Murder She Wrote kind of way, I mean mystery in the way that, even after the conclusion of the film, you still don’t quite know exactly what happened. David Robert Mitchell’s It Follows is a perfect example of that, and even with a few shortcomings, it’s a huge part of why I love this film. You have the main event, if you will, which is the mystery of whatever IT is, but there’s so many layers to that, that I think a lot of it is easy to miss.

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Lost Weekend III: It Follows

Lost Weekend III: Amira and Sam

Amira and Sam.jpg

A Romantic Comedy for the Ages

Could a veteran from the Iraq or Afghanistan Wars ever fall in love with Arabic woman? Veterans from the two wars see the ugly side of the Arabic world. American veterans see and extremism and oppression daily in Middle East and have to fight against those ideals that are so embedded in Arabic culture. They usually come back scarred from fight and suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  However, Amira and Sam show that two people can fall in love despite being complete opposites.

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Lost Weekend III: Amira and Sam

Lost Weekend III: Zero Motivation

I went to military school for four years, and it sucked the whole time. There were kids there who embraced it, and turned from ritalin-snorting criminals into pillars of military discipline, but I never fit that narrative– I was a nerd who snuck books into mandatory football games, and I hated pretty much everything about that place. Often, I would get in trouble, and be forced to stand at attention and get lectured about a whole bunch of things I didn’t give a crap about.

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Lost Weekend III: Zero Motivation

LOST WEEKEND III: MOMMY

If memory serves, ‘Mommy’ was the blast-off film for Lost Weekend III and was to set the tone for the coming films.  What a tone to set!

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Mommy‘ is, on the surface, a disarmingly simple study of a family’s mortifying dysfunction, mostly through the 15-year-old son’s ADHD and explosively violent behavior, blanketed with the mother’s efforts to show her brand of love while holding out hope for something better.  Anne Dorval is mostly very good in her portrayal of Diane Després, 40-something widow and mother to Steve, played with menacing-then-charming perfection by Antoine-Olivier Pilon.  The movie begins with Steve’s return home after being deinstitutionalized – after he had set fire to the cafeteria at the facility he was receiving care in (and injuring another patient there), Steve’s mom was given the choice to have him shipped off to the highly restrictive juvenile detention center (“That’s the beginning of the end…”) or bring him home to live with her again.  It is obvious from the start that Diane and Steve together are two highly flammable ingredients to an explosive cocktail, playing off each other’s emotions, each goading the other until the crescendo results in rather disturbing threats or actual acts of violence.  It is after one such outburst that the third main character, the odd next-door neighbor Kyla, played by the brilliant Suzanne Clément, is introduced to the pair, and rounds out the main troika that gallops through the film.

The bizarre chemistry between Kyla and Steve, and between Kyla and Diane, is more than simply captivating – it tends to draw the audience in.  Kyla, herself an audience member, has her own set of quirks – she has a prolonged stammer that entertains the asocial Steve, and is a recent arrival from Quebec where she used to teach high school but, for some unexplained (presumably dark) reason, quit her job and moved away with her husband and daughter.  At one point, we spy a framed photograph of what must be her young son, but who does not live in Kyla’s house.  As the film progresses, Kyla’s stammer becomes far less pronounced, but only when she is with Steve and Diane – and she finds herself with them often, apparently able to relax amidst (and in spite of) the tense atmosphere that the Després household often holds; in addition, since Steve’s home-schooling is beyond Diane’s ken, Kyla is asked to step in and provide her service as his teacher.

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The film demands a great deal from the audience.  The anger that lies beneath Steve’s every step is nearly tangible, to the point that we look for clues as to how he will react to any given stimulus at any particular point in the film.  That’s as much a tip of the hat to Pilon’s acting as to the film’s direction by Xavier Dolan.  Another demand is made right from the start, also by Dolan – the aspect of the film is reported to be at 1:1 – essentially a square or, if you will, a box in which each of the characters simmers or smiles.  The affect can be quite claustrophobic, and when close-ups are shot during scenes of violence, downright unsettling.  Finally, the audience is expected to sit tight and (presumably) try not to judge Diane, who obviously has been doing the best she can, given the hand that she’s been dealt – but almost all of her moves seem to be a display of rather terrible parenting.  She uses the word love in describing her feelings for Steve, but compassion and nurturing appear to be non-existent.  Trying to will a character to do the right thing when you can see things going downhill fast can take its toll on a movie-goer.  Twice or three times in a film?  No problem; it’s hard to have a plot without conflict.  But twenty to thrity?  Good lord.

ccIt can be argued that almost all of Steve’s problems in the story are either directly or indirectly linked to his mother’s actions.  We see it on the screen, when Steve is hectored into accompanying Diane with a male neighbor to a karaoke bar, where Steve is to be on his best behavior while Mommy and the neighbor wolf down drink after drink, discussing a pending lawsuit resulting from the cafeteria fire.  We see him trying, but we know it will end horribly.  The ensuing confrontations that night, as well as over the coming days, are heartbreaking.  We get the feeling that there is an unnecessary membrane of hopelessness covering Diane and Steve – Kyla can clearly see it, and we believe that she recognizes it doesn’t have to be that way.  The last straw comes in the final reel, when Steve is unwittingly brought to the juvenile detention facility by Diane in a display of surrender that she will not acknowledge.  That goes over exactly as we, the audience, felt it would, but by this time we are far too fatigued to shout at the screen.

When the credits begin to roll, we are left with so many questions.  For me, the main questions revolved around Kyla.  What happened to her son?  Why does she stammer?  What happened in school to make her have to quit her job (or was she fired?) and leave Quebec?  What makes her husband seemingly so aloof?  What attracts her to the drama-filled Després family?  Her character was enigmatic, the only character at first blush that seemed pure and unflawed, and yet we somehow know she isn’t.

Ultimately, this is a bleak and cheerless film.  I find that it fits right into Dolan’s film-writing and directing oeuvre.  While his wunderkind reputation was further solidified with the release of ‘Mommy,’ met with a nine-minute standing ovation at Cannes, I confess that I find him pretentious, and that he lives up to his image as an ‘untrustworthy’ story-teller.  Needless to say, he has his fair share of admirers and critics alike.

I suspect I simply don’t understand Dolan’s message with this film, and because of that, I cannot fully appreciate what he’s presenting me with.  I appreciated the filmmaking itself, and believe the acting was some of the best I’d seen all year, but because it is ultimately a painful and frustrating film to watch, it is one I would not quickly recommend.

LOST WEEKEND III: MOMMY

LOST WEEKEND II: Young Ones

source: www.newdvdreleasedates.com/m2503/young-ones-dvd-release-date
source: http://www.newdvdreleasedates.com/m2503/young-ones-dvd-release-date

Young ones is a Western in the greatest sense of sci-fi. To boiling down the plot, it’s a tale of a son’s revenge where the offending event happens 40 minutes in, once the viewer is adjusted to their surroundings. Set in a future where once fertile farmland is now a desert, and where it’s perfectly normal to wash your dishes with dust.

source: collider.com/young-ones-review/
source: collider.com/young-ones-review/

Ernest Holm (strongly played by Michael Shannon) is a father with an unknown past who is doing the best he can for his family.

source: www.promicabana.de/elle-fanning-nicholas-hoult-young-ones-trailer/
source: http://www.promicabana.de/elle-fanning-nicholas-hoult-young-ones-trailer/

His daughter named Mary (played by the quietly better Fanning sister Elle) questions everything about what’s happening instead of adapting.

source: www.audienceseverywhere.net/young-ones/
source: http://www.audienceseverywhere.net/young-ones/

His son named Jerome (played incredibly well by Kodi Smit-McPhee) looks to his father for direction, but still covers his bedroom walls with sketches of birds in flight, critters seen around the homestead, and the mysterious woman his father had seen on a weekly supply run the city. Oh, I forgot to mention, Jerome watches EVERYTHING.

Ernest has the critical job of making moonshine for the workers constructing a water pipeline, and controlling it’s supply of water to the local farmers.

source: nowtoronto.com/movies/reviews/young-ones/
source: nowtoronto.com/movies/reviews/young-ones/

After a supply run to the water men, the family’s pack mule is crippled and so the family buys a second hand robotic mule, even though the auctioneer’s son, Flem (played angelically & devilishly by Nicholas Hoult), has designs on steeling Ernest’s supply contract, and his daughter.

source:www.thelocationguide.com/blog/2014/10/ng-film-dystopian-movie-young-ones-films-south-africa-with-vfx-work-in-ireland/
source:www.thelocationguide.com/blog/2014/10/ng-film-dystopian-movie-young-ones-films-south-africa-with-vfx-work-in-ireland/

 

Thus the central conflict starts to ferment between the generations, old and young. It might be because I’m in my mid-30’s with a young family, but I related most to Ernest and felt his longing for the young to just wait for it and quit insisting on their brighter tomorrow right now.

Once things start getting better, the younger generation’s sins eventually lead to mortal consequences, Jerome discovers what REALLY happened to ‘dear old dad’, and the film climaxes in retribution for the betrayal of the first act.

Overall, Young Ones is one of those movies that is just as much about the details built into it from a wide plethora of Western and sci-fi influences than it is about the primary story along with a good measure of other details that help enrich and explain the world of the film. When I first heard about the Lost Weekend III line-up, Young Ones was a film I was immediately interested in, and at the same time a hopeful & apprehensive that it would be as good as expected. I’m happy to report that it was as good, if not better. It’s one that I would instantly recommend for both a Western & sci-fi film.

Now I realize that I’ve only talked about the first act, and that’s for good reason. So much of the appeal about this film is in how the story unfolds and runs its course in a world that feels lived-in. It really is a Western plot with futuristic elements which heighten and expose the conflict that would otherwise have been a hidden mystery.

Young Ones is also the kind of film that is incredibly smart in its use of budget and special effects. So much if the film is economical, from simple music and orchestration to the principal cast made up of experienced actors and actresses, but only one big name.

source: www.impawards.com/2014/young_ones_ver3.html
source: http://www.impawards.com/2014/young_ones_ver3.html

Even though it is still one of my favorite Film Club screenings, there were pockets of the film I had forgotten and got to relive again. So good. Bottom line, is it worth hunting down a copy of Young Ones and see this modernized western?? Yes, without reservation.

source:awardswatch.com/forums/showthread.php?37141-Official-Movie-Poster-Thread-2015-The-Beginininining-(I)/page26
source:awardswatch.com/forums/showthread.php?37141-Official-Movie-Poster-Thread-2015-The-Beginininining-(I)/page26

As a funny aside, when Mad Max: Fury Road was killing at the box office and garnering so much attention, Young One’s distributor tried to get more viewers by re-titling and re-branding the film as Badlands: Road to Fury. I’m fine with it, because it’s just changing the title, and wasn’t made strickly as a cash grab like it seems most films from The Asylum.

When he’s not driving to work, has his hands in his car and/or house, or is attending Film Club events as an #Awesome13, #Sweet16, and #Terrific20 alum, Benjamin can be found listening to podcasts and hoping to start his own one day. Reformed Trekker; self-identified Anglophile; and Anime fan by way of Akira, Ghibli, & Gundam. You can find him on the Film Club Facebook page asking for more ‘classics’ as well as right here planning his next meta review.
LOST WEEKEND II: Young Ones