That Day Omar Sy Stole Our Hearts with SAMBA: A Review

Probably unlike most social dramedies about the plight of the illegal migrant worker in France, Samba opens with a wedding. And boy, what a wedding! A troupe of professional dancers in flapper costumes prance around as the newly-wed couple cut the first sliver from an enormous tiered cake. Immediately afterwards, the cake is whisked away into the bowels of the hospitality hierarchy, whose first stop is the prepping table, where a dozen French chefs adorn dozens of plates with fresh raspberries. But we can’t stop here. Onwards down the pecking order because where we need to go is at the very bottom, where resides Samba Cissé (Omar Sy), the dish washer, mechanically wiping each soiled plate with his hand before putting it through the belt.

Continue reading “That Day Omar Sy Stole Our Hearts with SAMBA: A Review”

That Day Omar Sy Stole Our Hearts with SAMBA: A Review

Seductive Voices from Mixed Vegetables: Helene Reviews David Wain’s 2001 Cult Comedy Wet Hot American Summer

Wet Hot American Summer: ahead of its time while set twenty years in the past.

Continue reading “Seductive Voices from Mixed Vegetables: Helene Reviews David Wain’s 2001 Cult Comedy Wet Hot American Summer”

Seductive Voices from Mixed Vegetables: Helene Reviews David Wain’s 2001 Cult Comedy Wet Hot American Summer

When Long Dreams Include Powder Blue Skirt Suits and Platform Sandals: A Review of Quentin Dupieux’s REALITY

Late into Quentin Dupieux’s new film Reality, Jason Tantra (Alain Chabat), accompanied by a rifle he’s borrowed from a stranger, checks himself into a French mental hospital conveniently located in southern California, calls his friend the French producer Bob Marshal (Jonathan Lambert) in order to tell him that he’s stuck in a nightmare and won’t be able to meet the 72-hour deadline that Marshall has allotted him in order to record the Oscar-winning groan of the century.

Bob Marshal, in the meantime, is watching some very tedious footage shot by the hobo film genius Zog (John Glover) in which Reality (Kyla Kenedy), a precocious seven-year-old who has fished out a video cassette from the entrails of a hog her father has shot and killed, secretly watching the cassette before her parents wake up. Just as Bob Marshal is about to lose his temper over having to watch footage of this gamine watching a video cassette whose contents are hidden from our view, the footage pans to the television screen Reality has been studying, revealing that the film is of Jason on the phone with Marshal. Marshall and Zog watch as a perky nurse comes into Jason’s hospital room to give him a suppository sleep aid. Jason, still on the phone with Marshal, resists, arguing that, as he is in fact fast asleep, stuck in a nightmare, he doesn’t need a sleep aid. The nurse persists and the ensuing yowl that Jason lets out as the suppository enters him turns out to be the Oscar-winning groan he and Marshal have been searching for.


Did you get all that? Great.

Continue reading “When Long Dreams Include Powder Blue Skirt Suits and Platform Sandals: A Review of Quentin Dupieux’s REALITY”

When Long Dreams Include Powder Blue Skirt Suits and Platform Sandals: A Review of Quentin Dupieux’s REALITY